thirdeyeQ     BBQ Tools ~ Designed by thirdeye

Custom Tools

It has always been the disposition, if not the prerogative,
of mankind to boast of the tools with which he works
 Ramon F. Adams (1889-1976)
 
 
Custom Barbecue Tools ~ Designed and Fabricated by thirdeye
 
 
 If you own any kind of charcoal fueled cooker, take a look at my selection of Custom Tools.  I may have something that is perfect for you.  Right now, the line up consists of two grate lifting and hanging tools called a ThirdHand and a ThreeFinger.  I also have two versions of Wiggle Rods.  I also stock an air intake controller called a Micro Adjuster. 
 
 
The  Selection & Pricing Guide shows specific models of grills, barbecues and smokers that can utilize my tools.
 

 
 I also have fabricated many custom tools to your specifications, sometimes working from only an idea, or just a simple sketch.  Let me know If you have something special in mind, just use the Ask A Question   tab . If I can't help you, I can probably guide you  someone that can.
 
 
 
 
 
All my tools are fabricated by hand and there several steps in this process. One of the primary steps would be the welded connections on the lifting tools. This is time consuming, but like any good tool, mine are built to last. I like to work with stainless steel and I use Grade 304 stainless. Both grate lifters are made with 1/4 inch diameter round stock, and the Wiggles are 5/32 inch diameter round stock. The finish on the lifting tools can be described as "shop finish", which means they are cleaned and polished by hand only. You may notice a slight discoloration in the weld area. This is caused by the heat of welding and is normal.  Wiggle Rods and B-N-B Stickers feature an electro-polished finish.


ThirdHand Grate Lifting and Hanging Tool
 
"The tool that started it all"





Used on almost all standard grates & large cast iron grates
 
What do you use to remove your cooking grate while cleaning out the ashes and reloading your grill or smoker with fresh charcoal? Are you tired of getting your hands dirty handling your cooking grates? An extra hand would sure make things easier.... 
 
Back in 2006, I called the first grate tool I designed and fabricated the ThirdHand, a grate lifting tool that also works as a hanging tool if you have a table or deck railing close to your cooker. The ThirdHand works on standard cooking grates found most of the major brands of grills, barbecues or smokers. In addition, the ThirdHand works on large and XL cast iron grates. The ThirdHand is the most popular and most universal of my grate lifting and hanging tools. Usually, I have several on the shelf ready to go. Here are some action shots ot the ThirdHand..


                                                        

                                         
ThreeFinger Grate Lifting and Hanging Tool 
A special tool for small & medium sized cast iron grates

 
 
 
A short while after introduction of my first tool, I started getting requests for a tool specifically designed for lifting and hanging small and medium cast iron grates as well as smaller grates on "tailgater" or camping size grills. The answer was another original designed tool I call the ThreeFinger. It's a smaller tool with shorter forks and a handle that is three fingers wide.





 

 
 
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Wiggle Rods  
 
 Double-L Wiggle  &  T-Handle Wiggle
 
 



As I cruise around on barbecue forums, I just hate to see threads with a title something like "Help!!! My Fire Went Out". A wiggle rod is kind of an ash maintenance tool. Mine are fabricated from 5/32" diameter stainless steel rod. Wiggling your charcoal can help a stubborn fire get going, promote even burning, and is a little insurance during an all night cook when you want to catch some ZZZZZ's.

The most popular style is the T-Handle Wiggle Rod. They have a "L" on one end and my version has a "T" handle on the other. The "L" reaches up through the charcoal grate on ceramic cookers, or up through the bottom of the charcoal basket on drum cookers to stimulate air flow, and dislodge ash. The overall length and the "L" length are sized to your specific cooker. I'll need to know what you're cooking on.  T-Handle wiggle rods come in 7 standard sizes, to fit everything from mini ceramic cookers all the way to a 25" model for vertical drum cookers.  The mini wiggle rods are also useful when used from above as a fire poker to arrange charcoal without removing the grate.

The new Double-L wiggle rods are 14-1/2" in length and have an "L" on each end, but the "L's" are custom cut to different lengths for different cookers. Perfect if you have a pair of cookers in your backyard. Possible combinations would be a Small Big Green Egg and a Large Big Green Egg.  Or a Mini Big Green Egg and a Large Big Green Egg.  Double-L wiggle rods are not long enough to work with an XL Big Green Egg.  Here is how they work: You just hold one of the L's in your hand in a pistol grip fashion while wiggling the lump with the other L.  Some folks with only one cooker purchase the Double-L with a 1-1/2" L on one end so they can position wood chips or dig around in the lump from above.  They use the other end to wiggle the lump from below.  
 
Wiggle Rod Instructions

 A Wiggle Rod enters a cooker through the lower air vent, then reaches up into the fire box or charcoal basket during the cook. A gentle back and forth wiggle will dislodge ash and create some positive air flow. It's best to experiment with a partial load of fresh un-lit charcoal. Fill your cooker about 1/3 full, then insert the Wiggle Rod, grip the "T" handle or the "L" bend in your fist, then pay close attention to the effect that wiggling has on the charcoal. It does not take much motion to do the job. In actual use, you can wiggle in several spots. I generally wiggle my charcoal about 10 minutes after lighting, then maybe once more after several hours into a long cook. I always give the coals a wiggle if my pit temperature drops unexpectedly, or before napping during an overnight cook.

A Wiggle Rod enters a cooker through the lower air vent, then reaches up into the fire box or charcoal basket during the cook. A gentle back and forth wiggle will dislodge ash and create some positive air flow. It's best to experiment with a partial load of fresh un-lit charcoal. Fill your cooker about 1/3 full, then insert the Wiggle Rod, grip the "T" handle or the "L" bend in your fist, then pay close attention to the effect that wiggling has on the charcoal. It does not take much motion to do the job. In actual use, you can wiggle in several spots. I generally wiggle my charcoal about 10 minutes after lighting, then maybe once more after several hours into a long cook. I always give the coals a wiggle if my pit temperature drops unexpectedly, or before napping during an overnight cook.

 
 
Brisket-N-Butt Sticker
 
A special probe for monitoring tenderness of large cuts of beef and pork.
Standard size is 12" long - - The "Pitmaster T" model is a whopping 24" long.



 
 
 
The Brisket-N-Butt Sticker is a handheld probe for judging tenderness on the larger barbecue meats like brisket, pork butt, chuck roll or shoulder clod.  Experienced barbecuists use a combination of internal temperature and tenderness to determine when meats are done.  The stainless steel Brisket-N-Butt Sticker features a T-Handle and a 12" length to reach into your pit when probing meats for tenderness. 
 
If you want a longer BNB Sticker, just let me know.  Maybe you want to sneak in through the top vent on your ceramic cooker. The longest model is nicknamed the "Pitmaster T" and it is 24" in length.  I named it after my buddy Donny who cooks on a pit so large the shelves may be loaded with briskets 3 or 4 deep.

What is the best way to probe a brisket?  Ideally, you want to monitor tenderness by judging resistance to the probe in both directions.... sliding in and pulling back out.  It might feel tender sliding in, but might not slide out easily.  When it feels tender sliding in and back out you are getting close. Wait until your internal temperature is around 180° and do your first probe. Take a mental note of the tenderness.  Make another reading when your internal temperature is around 190°.  Compare the tenderness to your first probing.  If you don't like the feel, check it again at 195°.   No matter what kind of probe you are using, pick an area in the flat and probe in the direction shown below.  Don't come in from the side or the end.  I don't worry about the point, it's usually done before the flat and since it has a higher fat content, it will take care of itself.   A lot of my briskets have cooked themselves tender between 190° and 195°. 


All my tools are fabricated from Grade 304 stainless steel, they are designed and built in the USA.
 







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